Alcohol Abuse

alcohol treatment

Alcohol abuse is a perfect handling of psychiatric diagnosis that is clearly described in DSM-IV. It describes the use of alcoholic beverage in spite of a negative result. It contains ethanol commonly known as alcohol which is a psychoactive drug and has depressant effect. The central nervous functioning badly gets depressed and it results to plenty of serious side effects. It is differentiated from the physical dependence of alcohol by lack of symptom such as withdrawal and tolerance. Sometimes it is referred as alcoholism. There are lots of definitions of alcoholism but among them only some are compatible with alcohol abuse. Currently, with comparable numbers in other countries, there are approximately 9 million alcoholics in United States alone. There is little difference between alcoholism and alcohol abuse according to Max Fisher who is the author of How do I stopped drinking.

Intake of alcohol will result in biphasic health effects and troubles the overall physique and they change from one time period to another. Bad level of alcohol intake could cause serious consequences like coordination troubles and blurred vision. When the level of alcohol tends to increase, it certainly disturbs the biological tissue, as the cell membranes present in the body are easily permeable to the impact of alcohol intake. Excessive drinking could lead to severe poisoning and even death. Regular intake of alcohol will risk the person’s life by developing alcoholic liver disease, alcoholism side effects, and several other cancer types too. Huge intake of alcoholic level over a time period could badly affect the human brain and it hassles the mental development. Studies have shown that alcohol dependence relates directly to cravings and irritability. Considerable evidence suggests a connection between gravid alcohol intake and increased risk for cancer.

<3> Treatment can vary for Alcohol Abuse. Many times, there are issues of alcohols which are associated with group treatment that is entirely composed of women and alcoholism. For example it can help to tend tissues that surround male abusers. Rehabilitation centers are instructed are instructed for detoxification if treated improperly as there can be serious physical effects including death.

valogra17 posted a photo: Complex post-traumatic disorder coping with art, alcohol and drugs Photographer: Moses Njie 0465650183 Njie.mb@gmail.com
CreativePhotoTeam.com posted a photo: Whiskey glass with bonfire background Whiskey glass with bonfire background
brent.hofacker posted a photo: Delicious Bourbon Whiskey Neat Delicious Bourbon Whiskey Neat in a Glass
piano62 posted a photo: Irving Park Portraits Jerry and his girlfriend have lived here through the last two winters.
Ron Coddington posted a photo: Charley’s Legacy Carte de visite of Charles Gloyd by Peckover of Paris, Ky. Charley Gloyd came away from his experience as a captain in the 118th Ohio Infantry with three-years of memories—and an addiction to liquor. Charley continued to drink after the war with his brother Masons. No one was more familiar with his raging alcoholism than his wife, Carry, whom he wed in 1867. Two years later the marriage ended with Charley’s demise at age 29. He drank himself to death, and in doing so shared the fate of many a soldier trying to cope with life after the army.

Carry, 23, was left a widow with an infant daughter. She struggled for a few years before meeting a new man who became her husband.

When I reveal his name, you’ll know the rest of her story.

He was David Nation.

I encourage you to use this image for educational purposes only. However, please ask for permission.

Research about the life and military service of this soldier is currently in progress. If you have any information to share, including letters, journals, and other personal and public documents, please contact me.
Belli Research Institute Archives posted a photo: Brain of an Alcoholic Vagrant, Myrtelle M. Canavan (1914) "Dr. Myrtelle May Canavan, pathologist with the Massachusetts Department of Mental Diseases and a member of the staff of the Boston Psychopathic Hospital, displayed enlarged photographs of fifty brains of criminals and feeble-minded individuals at the exhibition attached to the meeting of the Second International Congress in 1921... This specimen, no. 576, shows the brain of a Canadian alcoholic vagrant whose mother died insane. Dr. Canavan and Louise Eisenhardt published this series of photographs as The brains of fifty insane criminals : shapes and patterns, in 1942." (Source: collections.countway.harvard.edu/onview/items/show/6229)

Alcoholism Information Resources



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